EXPLORE IN 3D

KOZAN, TEA BOWL, JAPAN, 19th CENTURY

Looking into the interior of this Japanese tea bowl, we see a crowd watching a sumo wrestling match. Zoom closely to discover a fight breaking out amongst the audience, men dancing and eating with chopsticks. Painted with a single-hair brush, the decoration boasts extremely fine detail – it is even possible to see the individual hairs on the back of the sumo wrestler.

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Shipwreck Teapot, China, 1654-1722

This teapot was recovered from a shipwreck off the coast of Porto in Portugal. Look inside the teapot to view the remnants of barnacles from its prolonged time on the ocean floor. Made in China, the blue under-glaze design of willow plants and a water buffalo has become matte due to saltwater removing the glaze.

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Teapot, Yixing, China, ca.1700

Made from a red stoneware known as zisha or ‘purple sand’, this teapot was adorned with gilt-metal mounts upon arrival in the Netherlands in the early 18th century. A dragon is poised on the lid, while a cockerel sits on the spout. The red clay was admired for its fine texture and thin walls that could be left unglazed.

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Teapot, Meissen porcelain manufactory, Germany, ca. 1735

This Meissen monkey teapot was once in the collection of the 1st Duke of Windsor, formerly King Edward VIII, or ‘the Abdicator.’ Move around to see the skilfully dynamic modelling of the porcelain, and the detailed overglaze enamel painting – particularly the fine strokes portraying the monkeys’ fur.

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Tea Caddy, Fabergé, Russia, 1908-1917

Vivid blue, dusky turquoise, mustard yellow and rusty maroon stand out on this Russian Fabergé tea caddy. Looking closely, we can see the intricate patterns created in cloisonné enamels. Centrally placed on each side is a stylised bird, reminiscent of a peacock.

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Admiral Nelson’s Teapot, England, 1799-1802

Engraved with an ‘N’ for its original owner, Admiral Lord Nelson, this small teapot is made of silver, with wooden handle and ivory finial. Flip it upside down to see the silver hallmarks stamped on its base. These indicate the maker, the year, the assay office, the duty mark and the purity of the silver.

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