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Did you know that the blue pigment found on all Chinese blue-and-white porcelain is obtained from ground cobalt oxide? The pigment was mixed with  water and applied with a brush to the porcelain, which was then covered with a clear glaze before a final firing in the kiln. Referred to as  nameless rarity in Chinese, the mineral was imported from Iran in small quantities due to its high cost. Blue-and-white porcelain, such as this teapot, dominated the Chinese export trade until the end of the 17th century, and was immensely popular in Vietnam, the Middle East and later in Europe, where it was collected in vast quantities and highly valued by the wealthy.

Did you know that the blue pigment found on all Chinese blue-and-white porcelain is obtained from ground cobalt oxide? The pigment was mixed with water and applied with a brush to the porcelain, which was then covered with a clear glaze before a final firing in the kiln. Referred to as 'nameless rarity' in Chinese, the mineral was imported from Iran in small quantities due to its high cost. Blue-and-white porcelain, such as this teapot, dominated the Chinese export trade until the end of the 17th century, and was immensely popular in Vietnam, the Middle East and later in Europe, where it was collected in vast quantities and highly valued by the wealthy. ... See MoreSee Less

 

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What a lovely example you have chosen to share!

Very nice! Here is my ‘clobbered’ teapot featuring oriental figures. The teapot is Kangxi period (c.1700) and the decoration applied in either London or Amsterdam. Do you have any clobbered teapots?