ABOUT THE CHITRA COLLECTION

SEARCH THE COLLECTION

COLLECTION HIGHLIGHTS

LATEST NEWS

This harewood tea caddy, made around 1790 is decorated with intricate floral sprays in marquetry, our #techniqueoftheweek. This labour-intensive method involves applying paper-thin veneers of wood cut to a design that is then pieced together and applied to the base. Although examples are found dating to ancient Rome, it was popular in England from the 1760s when a revival of Neoclassical designs in the French taste became fashionable. Cabinet makers such as Thomas Chippendale became closely associated with the technique in their designs.

This harewood tea caddy, made around 1790 is decorated with intricate floral sprays in marquetry, our #techniqueoftheweek. This labour-intensive method involves applying paper-thin veneers of wood cut to a design that is then pieced together and applied to the base. Although examples are found dating to ancient Rome, it was popular in England from the 1760s when a revival of Neoclassical designs in the 'French taste' became fashionable. Cabinet makers such as Thomas Chippendale became closely associated with the technique in their designs. ... See MoreSee Less

 

Comment on Facebook

I love wooden objects,and the tea caddy is just beautiful.

Oh it's beautiful , love the intricate designs 😉

I would never have guessed that was a classical method. Wow! Now I need to look for some of those ancient examples.

Perfection in wood, incredible.

So how is this technique different than inlay? Which is what I thought the thin veneer pattern design was called..or is that another method?

Gorgeous

Gorgeous !

Beautiful.

Rachel Johns

+ View more comments